First and foremost, this project is a labor of love. Second, it is a tribute to Kamakura, my home for the past 20 years, and home to dozens of temples from the Kamakura Era , which still house and display wondrous life-size wooden statues from the 8th century onward. Third, this project was prompted by a dissatisfaction with the online sites of the great repositories of Japanese Buddhist sculpture — the national museums in Tokyo , Kyoto , and Nara. There is no comprehensive online catalog. Even so, the situation is much improved compared to only 15 years ago, thanks largely to advances in web technology. And to be fair, this is not just a problem with museums in Japan.

EVERYDAY LIFE IN JAPAN

Modernity for Japan has been a process of seeking definition in its cultural and political relationships with other nations, both Asian and Western. Also during this time Japan was directly involved in two international conflicts: Victorious in both these conflicts, Japan proved its ability to gear its newly established industrial base to the achievement of foreign expansionist goals. In Japan officially annexed Korea, a process it had begun in when it assumed a protectorate status over the peninsular nation.

Six character iron red stamped mark on the base, Jiangxi Yu Yuan Chang Zuo where Jiangxi is the province where most of the Chinese porcelain industry is located, Yu is a name meaning ‘gold’, Yuan is a name, meaning ‘first’ or ‘primary’, Chang, is a name, meaning ‘prosperous’ and zuo meaning ‘workshop’.

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Dating Wade Marks Keys to Dating Wade pottery and identifying Wade Marks Wade is historically famous for the introduction of the very collectible Wade Whimsies and the, almost as well known but not as popular today, Wade Gurgle Jugs and Decanters. His father was a potters thrower and later became a manager.

The original Wade company manufactured ceramic products for the cotton industry as well as porcelain figures and groups. In George Wade purchased the ceramics business of Henry Hallen of Wellington Street, Burslem and combined both businesses to form a new ceramics manufactory he called the Manchester Pottery.

Young George was only 2 years old when his older sister Daisy, died in leaving George an only child. In , George Albert Wade left school and joined the Wade family business just as his father acquired the Hallen business and the Manchester Pottery began operations. Over the years the Wade pottery companies and Wade Marks included:

Japanese pottery and porcelain

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Collecting Antique Ceramics Collecting Antique Ceramics offers the widest range of opportunities for antique collectors, buyers, and sellers. When collecting antique ceramics, you are collecting some of the most delicate, most beautiful and most varied items that manufacturers can produce. There are vastly more antique objects made of pottery, porcelain, earthenware or stoneware than of any other material and you probably have some beautiful antique ceramics in your home.

You are more likely to possess antique pottery and porcelain than you are antique silver, glass or furniture. The care, beauty and craftsmanship manufacturers and artists build into the form, and the decoration of pottery and porcelain is only rarely surpassed by items in other fields of antique collecting. Sales of Royal Doulton and Royal Worcester collectibles continue to rise and prove to be a wise investment over the longer term.

This is a short history of import markings and dating of Japanese ceramics dates range from pre to the today. This is just a general guide and, as always, individual pieces may vary!

A potter at work in Jaura, Madhya Pradesh , India Clay ware takes on varying physical characteristics during the making of pottery. Greenware refers to unfired objects. At sufficient moisture content, bodies at this stage are in their most plastic form they are soft and malleable, and hence can be easily deformed by handling.

Leather-hard refers to a clay body that has been dried partially. Clay bodies at this stage are very firm and only slightly pliable. Trimming and handle attachment often occurs at the leather-hard state. It is now ready to be bisque fired.

Antique Chinese Porcelain Help and Information

The way a base of a vessel is cut, finished and glazed changes throughout the dynasties, so looking at bases can help enormously with dating and authentication. Potters who are trying to fake ceramics often may not have an original example to look at, relying instead on photographs in auction catalogues or books that do not feature the bases. A ding white-glazed melon-shaped ewer, Five Dynasties-Northern Song dynasty

A helpful dating tip in the labyrinth of Japanese marks is it is generally accepted that marks that include “Dai Nippon” in Japanese characters, on the whole, date to the Meiji ( to ) period, reflecting the greatly increased nationalism of the time. Many early Japanese pottery marks were hand-painted, as they were viewed as a signature.

Everyday the Japanese are packed together like sardines on subways and in kitchen-size yakatori bars and sushi restaurants. A dozen lap swimmers may squeeze into single lane at a swimming pool. Bicycles and pedestrians fight for space on crowded sidewalks, which are especially packed on rainy days and sunny days, when umbrellas are out in force. Businessmen spend the night in coffin-sized sleeping capsules. People entertain outside their homes because there is no room to entertain guests inside their homes.

Lawns are so small they are cut with scissors and gardens are so small Japanese say they will fit on a “cat’s forehead.

Collecting Antique Ceramics

The occasion of dramatically increased interaction with other cultures seemed to require a convenient summary of Japanese aesthetic principles, and Japanese art historians and archaeologists began to construct methodologies to categorize and assess a vast body of material ranging from Neolithic pottery to wood-block prints. Formulated in part from contemporary scholarly assessments and in part from the syntheses of enthusiastic generalists, these theories on the characteristics of Japanese culture and, more specifically, Japanese art not unexpectedly bore the prejudices and tastes of the times.

There was, for example, a tendency to cast the court art of the Heian period — as the apex of Japanese artistic achievement. The aesthetic preference for refinement, for images subtly imbued with metaphoric meaning, reflected the sublimely nuanced court mores that permitted only oblique reference to emotion and valued suggestion over bold declaration.

The Japanese have one of the longest continuous ceramic cultures in the world, with the earliest ceramics dating to around 10 BC. Tea ceremony from the 15th century The popularity of the tea ceremony from the 15th century fostered an aesthetic appreciation of ceramics, especially imported Chinese wares, which became valued as works of art.

Featured Artists Japanese pottery has evolved over the centuries into a high art form. Pottery played a central role in development of Japanese art and culture. Zen monks were among the first to extol the virtue and beauty of simple austerity. By the Momoyama period , a unique aesthetic sensibility was firmly established with the acceptance of ceramic utensils for the Japanese tea ceremony by influential tea masters like Sen-no-Rikyu.

The Edo period saw an exuberant explosion of artistry at all levels of society, yet striving for quiet nobility and restrained elegance remained the highest goal of artistic achievement. Today, ceramists in various pottery centers continue their heritage, producing timeless works of art using traditional materials and techniques refined through centuries of experience.

Touching Stone Gallery honors this rich heritage by showing significant bodies of work of outstanding contemporary ceramic artists from Japan. All the exhibitions in our gallery are viewable on our web site, bringing the works to international attention and offering a useful resource for collectors and artists worldwide.

Japanese art

This cultural interaction was facilitated in part by land bridges that… General characteristics The study of Japanese art has frequently been complicated by the definitions and expectations established in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when Japan was opened to the West. The occasion of dramatically increased interaction with other cultures seemed to require a convenient summary of Japanese aesthetic principles, and Japanese art historians and archaeologists began to construct methodologies to categorize and assess a vast body of material ranging from Neolithic pottery to wood-block prints.

Formulated in part from contemporary scholarly assessments and in part from the syntheses of enthusiastic generalists, these theories on the characteristics of Japanese culture and, more specifically, Japanese art not unexpectedly bore the prejudices and tastes of the times. There was, for example, a tendency to cast the court art of the Heian period — as the apex of Japanese artistic achievement. The aesthetic preference for refinement, for images subtly imbued with metaphoric meaning, reflected the sublimely nuanced court mores that permitted only oblique reference to emotion and valued suggestion over bold declaration.

20th Century Japanese Anglo-Japanese Ceramics. Ceramic. This is a large vintage Japanese baluster vase, a highly decorated oriental ceramic urn dating to the mid-late 20th century. Of classic form and in good proportion Of quality cra Negotiable.

Curtis The Shunzhi era , marking the end of the Ming Dynasty and the beginning of the Qing, was a transitional period in Chinese history. As far as porcelain was concerned, until the last 20 years, it was a little-known reign not only in the West but in China itself. By the late s, painters on porcelain had developed a new, highly recognizable, and successful style. Many of the innovative themes were taken from woodblock prints, with landscapes and narrative scenes particularly inspired by contemporary scroll and album paintings.

In the Shunzhi era, more than any other time in the last years of Chinese porcelain, there was a strong emphasis on individual works of art, each one unique. This is hands down the best book on Transitional Porcelain I have ever seen, but no books I have listed here are bad. The list of authors tells it all. I cannot believe why it is so inexpensive. It is very sad if it is because the porcelain prices themselves have gone through the roof but it would not need to be.

Pieces from this period between the two last dynasties can still be had and is usually priced below its merits, just because there were no Imperial court around that kept an eye on what the best potters did. From an artistic point if view, this period is a high point in the history of Chinese ceramics. This books shows why.

Japanese Porcelain Marks

The Japanese have one of the longest continuous ceramic cultures in the world, with the earliest ceramics dating to around 10 BC. Tea ceremony from the 15th century The popularity of the tea ceremony from the 15th century fostered an aesthetic appreciation of ceramics, especially imported Chinese wares, which became valued as works of art. The strong demand for ceramics resulted in a surge of creativity during the Momoyama period , with thousands of kilns developing their own distinct regional characteristics.

High-fired stoneware were central to this tradition. Ri Sampei, the “father” of Japanese porcelain After the Japanese invasions of Korea in and , a number of skilled Korean potters who had learned from the Chinese how to produce fine porcelain, were brought back to Japan. Some of these settled in Arita in northern Kyushu, where they discovered porcelain clay.

Backstamps and identifying marks for Japanese collectibles. H ome I dentifying marks U kiyo-e censor ceals T ime Warped News J apanese Pottery Marks A dventure Story M y .

Production process The following discussion of production processes draws heavily on the work of Howard Williams. Williams’ sources are general ceramic texts and information from his discussions and correspondence with museum curators and other experts. Different combinations of ingredients were used to produce Gaudy Welsh. Finished pieces were called earthenware, cream-ware, ironstone or bone china. Bottom of the range was earthenware; top of the range was bone china.

Earthenware, used for much Gaudy Welsh production, was the relatively cheap, durable and serviceable option. There were three stages in the production process. First came the preliminary processing of clay mixtures. This included removing impurities blunging , sieving plugging and mixing of ingredients wedging.

Second the clay was formed into ‘bodies’. Gaudy Welsh body shapes are quite numerous and a combination of the methods of throwing, jiggering and jollying, casting and pressing were used to make them. Generally the pieces were hand thrown on the potter’s wheel and moulds and pattern tools were used to shape cups and jugs. Handles, finials ornamental tops and feet were attached separately. There are several indications that the pieces were intended to be used.

Ming Dynasty Bowl Sells for $18 Million